Home Announcements US military tests can jam GPS signals, warns FAA

US military tests can jam GPS signals, warns FAA

FAA warns airplane pilots about testing of a device or devices over the West Coast can jam GPS signals
FAA warns airplane pilots about testing of a device or devices over the West Coast can jam GPS signals

US: The Federal Aviation Authority has warned airplane pilots that testing a device or devices on the West Coast and especially over California and Nevada will potentially jam GPS signals for six hours each day.

The reason is yet not clear, but according to a website, the US military device testing can jam GPS signals for six hours each day. Officially the tests were announced by the FAA but are centered near the US Navy’s largest installation in the Mojave Desert, China Lake, located “just down the road” from Area 51. The Navy has kept silent about the nature of the tests.

FAA has issued an advisory warning pilots on Saturday that global positioning systems (GPS) could be unreliable during six different days this month, primarily in the Southwestern United States. On June 7, 9, 21, 23, 28, and 30th, the GPS interference testing will be taking place between 9:30am and 3:30pm Pacific time. But if you’re on the ground, you probably won’t notice interference.

The dates and times of potential GPS outages per the FAA are shown below:  7 JUN 16 1630Z – 2230Z; 9 JUN 16 1630Z – 2230Z; 21 JUN 16 1630Z – 2230Z; 23 JUN 16 1630Z – 2230Z; 28 JUN 16 1630Z – 2230Z; and 30 JUN 16 1630Z – 2230Z.

The testing will be centered on China Lake, California—home to the Navy’s 1.1 million acre Naval Air Weapons Center in the Mojave Desert. The potentially lost signals will stretch hundreds of miles in each direction and will affect various types of GPS, reaching the furthest at higher altitudes. But the jamming will only affect aircraft above 50 feet.

This means that billionaires flying into Santa Monica will have to find alternative routes in the affected intervals, due to the FAA‘s warning that the jamming test could interfere with the business jet’s “aircraft flight stability controls.”

Source: Zero Hedge