US Army uses GIS for renewable energy planning

US Army uses GIS for renewable energy planning

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US: The US Army Environmental Command (USAEC) recently provided geospatial analyses and customised mapping support to US Army’s Energy Initiatives Task Force (EITF) for identifying army lands for the renewable energy projects. By 2025, the US Army aims to convert 25% of its energy consumption from renewable energy sources.
The shaded areas represent “clear parcels” compared to Sustainable Range Program map of Fort Campbell, Ky. Photo Credit: Fort Hood Sentinel

Above: The shaded areas represent “clear parcels” compared to Sustainable Range Program map of Fort Campbell, Ky. Photo Credit: Fort Hood Sentinel

USAEC developed a clear parcels methodology that analysed installation geospatial data nationwide. The goal of the analysis was to identify areas on installations that were both suitable for renewable energy projects and that were not excluded because of a variety of mission-related factors.
At the end of the first stage of the analysis, all excluded areas were merged together into a single layer and overlaid on aerial imagery for quality control. Since, topography plays an important role in determining suitability for construction projects, the second stage of the analysis involved a collection of 10-meter digital elevation models obtained from the US Geological Survey (USGS) to determine the percentage of slope, or change in elevation over a specified distance, and eliminating those areas greater than 20-percent slope from consideration. The final output from the clear parcels analysis was used in custom maps created for EITF personnel to develop a general understanding of the areas potentially available for renewable energy projects.

This large scale geospatial analysis may be the first of its kind to illustrate the utility of Army Mapper in linking Army installations with headquarters requirements for more detailed site analyses.

Source: Fort Hood Sentinel