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Strauss Center develops tool to map climate change

Ethiopia: In partnership with AidData, Strauss Center developed an online data portal to enable both researchers and policymakers to visualise data specific to climate change vulnerability, conflict and aid. The data analysis is also set to evaluate how these issues intersect within the continent of Africa. The Strauss Center developed the tool as part of the Climate Change and African Political Stability (CCAPS) programme.
“The complex pathways from climate change to security impacts have demanded new datasets to fill knowledge gaps, but also new ways of presenting the data to be of most use in policy planning,” said Francis J. Gavin, Director of the Strauss Center. “This mapping tool allows policymakers to analyse data from multiple sources at once, providing integrated analysis of the drivers and responses related to security risks stemming from climate change.”
The mapping tool, which uses Esri technology, allows users to select and layer any combination of CCAPS data onto one map to assess how myriad climate change impacts and responses intersect. For example, mapping conflict data over climate vulnerability data can assess how local conflict patterns could exacerbate climate-induced insecurity in a region. It also shows how conflict dynamics are changing over time and space.
“Climate change poses an enormous threat to the livelihoods and safety nets of millions of Africans. However the level of risk is not evenly spread and certainly doesn’t respect national boundaries,” said Jean-Louis Sarbib, CEO of Development Gateway. “To ask critical questions about how development assistance can reduce vulnerability, you need hyper-local data on climate, and also on aid-funded interventions. This is what the new CCAPS mapping tool shows in a digestible, interactive way. It will no doubt be a valuable new tool not only for researchers, but also policymakers, journalists and citizens.”
To assess the interaction of climate vulnerability and international aid, users can locate aid projects funded by the 27 donors tracked in Malawi’s Aid Management Platform, layered on top of climate change vulnerability data. Mapping such aid flows provides a new way to discern if adaptation aid is effectively targeting the regions where climate change poses the most significant risk to the sustainable development and political stability of a country.
It represents the first effort of the sort envisioned by the Open Aid Partnership, an initiative spearheaded by the World Bank to increase the openness and effectiveness of development assistance at the sub-national level.
While the mapping tool is in its first stage of development, the next stage will convey a comprehensive picture of trends in Africa through the use of thematic mapping tools. Users will be able to access raw CCAPS data and use the mapping tool to combine CCAPS datasets with other organizations’ data to aggregate and disaggregate data in the way that is most useful to them. The thematic mapping tools will include data on:- Climate Change Vulnerability: Users will visualize the different components of the CCAPS Vulnerability Model, using both historical and projected climate data for Africa. Conflict: Users will access the current Armed Conflict Location and Event Data, real-time ACLED conflict data updated weekly, and CCAPS’ Social Conflict and Africa Database.- Adaptation Aid: In addition to the current development aid projects in Malawi, the mapping tool will include climate-coded aid projects in select countries and continent-wide data on adaptation aid.Governance: Users will access the first-ever continent-wide database classifying the political institutions in Africa on a spectrum of constitutional design, as well as data on governance quality and disaster management.
The current mapping tool is available through a user-friendly interface via: www.strausscenter.org/ccaps/mappingtool
Source: WNN