Scientists develops system to track atmospheric air pollution

Scientists develops system to track atmospheric air pollution

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A group of scientists from University of Bremen, Germany are trying to develop a system using which you can track the air pollution in your city. (Picture for illustration purpose only.)

Germany: A group of scientists from University of Bremen, Germany are trying to develop a system using which you can track the air pollution in your city. In order to obtain a general picture of the pollution in the atmosphere, the scientists are using various methods for collecting different kinds of data.

The earth’s atmosphere is a complicated system and it keeps on changing for which a large number of factors are responsible. Observation satellites orbiting around our planet constantly monitor the state of the air we breath and how natural and man-made pollution are affecting the quality of the atmosphere.

Based on all such calculations, the Bremen University researchers have pioneered a measurement of the atmospheric pollution.

To detect every piece of the chemical puzzle composing our atmosphere, scientists work with data collected by spectrometers, aerosol analysis and satellite measurements as with the ones coming from the Earth observation Copernicus programme.

“Measurements from space are essential because they provide us with the global picture from the local to the global scale. They to tell us what the meteorology and atmospheric chemistry are doing to our emissions.

‘The wind system is moving the air around. At certain times of the year Europe is venting to the pristine regions of the Arctic. Similarly, in Europe, we receive in summer, often, pollution coming from America. We have to understand the sources, the so-called surface fluxes, the emissions and we also have to understand the atmospheric chemistry and physics which enables the pollution to be sent around the globe,” explained John Philip Burrows, Professor of Physics of Atmosphere and Oceans, University of Bremen.