Recent breakthroughs in geospatial analysis revealed in two new books

Recent breakthroughs in geospatial analysis revealed in two new books

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Mountain regions are significant to human activities in a variety of ways, and some of these same characteristics combine to present a non-trivial challenge to those who wish to study them using geospatial techniques. Recent breakthroughs in geospatial analysis have allowed earth scientists to study mountain environments in new ways. Some of these exciting works is highlighted in two newly published books: Geographic Information Science and Mountain Geomorphology, edited by Bishop and Shroder (2004); and Geographic Information Systems in Fisheries, edited by Fisher and Rahel (2004).

The 14 chapters in the Bishop and Shroder book promote GIS as a “powerful enabling technology,” but more attention is devoted to GIS-based analysis and modeling for extracting and generating information about process-form adjustments and space-time relationships.

The Geographic Information Systems in Fisheries book contains numerous examples of using GIS to describe and explain fish species distributions, individual habitat variables and overall habitat suitability in mountain streams and beyond, including lakes, reservoirs, coastal waters and the ocean.