NID and Autodesk join hands to promote design education in India

NID and Autodesk join hands to promote design education in India

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India, 1 February 2007 – The National Institute of Design (NID) and Autodesk have signed an agreement which will help NID students develop skills of computer aided design.

Richard Jones, Vice President of Autodesk said that under the agreement students on all three campuses – Ahmedabad, Bangalore and Gandhinagar – will be equipped with the latest versions of Autodesk’s design software such as Autodesk Inventor, AutoCAD Mechanical, AutoCAD electrical and ALIAS design tools.

Explaining the significance of these tools in design education, Dr. Darlie O Koshy, Director, NID said that this would give digital edge to the design and as a result students will be able to develop better designs in lesser time.

As part of the three year agreement between the two, Autodesk would also sponsor new Research Chair for Design Education Innovation and setting up of the Centre of Excellence for digital innovation. The chair will focus on developing innovative design curriculum to be offered across multiple tiers of education system, said Dr. Koshy.

– About National Institute of Design
The National Institute of Design (NID) (https://www.nid.edu/) is internationally acclaimed as one of the foremost multi-disciplinary institutions in the field of design education and research. The institute functions as an autonomous body under the Ministry of Commerce & Industry, Government of India. NID is recognised by the Dept. of Scientific & Industrial Research (DSIR) under Department of Science & Technology, Government of India, as a scientific and industrial design research organisation.

NID has been a pioneer in industrial design education after Bauhaus and Ulm in Germany and is known for its pursuit of design excellence to make Designed in India, Made for the World a reality. NID’s graduates have made a mark in key sectors of commerce, industry and social development by taking role of catalysts and through thought leadership.