GWF2014: Seamless environment across lifecycle phases key to smart infra

GWF2014: Seamless environment across lifecycle phases key to smart infra

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Geneva: The infrastructural needs are increasing day-by-day; and it is a challenge to meet them. While there is a need to manage a broad spectrum of diverse information, there is also a need to encourage multi-disciplinary teams to collaborate and best practice tools in their projects. As highlighted by Chair and Moderator Georg Gartner, President of the International Cartography Association, the fourth and last plenary of the Geospatial World Forum 2014 on May 7 focused on the seamless environment across lifecycle phases for maximum efficiency in infrastructure development.

Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director, European GNSS Agency (GSA), spoke on the growing need for GNSS services across businesses and explained how the agency, which is responsible for laying down and regulating the GNSS services in Europe, is managing the ambitious Galileo project. The agency is also involved in developing the market for adoption of GNSS services across Europe and has been working in getting market intelligence in this regard. It is also looking at user and value chain assistance and continuous improvement in services. The main sectors identified by the agency where it thinks GNSS has great potential are civil aviation (a sector GSA already serves with its EGNOSS programme), road transport, tolling, railways (GNSS penetration in railways installed base is still below 4%), surveying and mapping, and utility infrastructure among others. GSA recently established its headquarters in Prague, Czech Republic and also opened Galileo Security Monitoring Centres in France and UK.

Peter Hansford, Chief Construction Adviser, the London Government, explained how the government is betting on smart construction to reduce costs of public construction projects by 15-20% by the end of the current Parliament term
Peter Hansford: Government is betting on smart construction to reduce costs of public construction projects by 15-20% by the end of the current Parliament term.

Speaking on UK’s vision of smart infrastructure, Peter Hansford, Chief Construction Adviser, the London Government, explained how the government is betting on smart construction to reduce costs of public construction projects by 15-20% by the end of the current Parliament term. The vision, which promotes use of smart technology like BIM in all construction projects, amounts to a target of reducing costs worth 2 billion pounds over four years. It includes a faster delivery time of 50% and seeks to lower emissions by half. “We will not achieve these big targets with small incremental changes. We need drastic changes,” Hansford said, adding that UK has made Level II BIM mandatory for use by 2016 while there is work on adoption of Level III BIM is in partnership with the industry. Smart construction is central to transformation of the construction sector in UK and for this a solid partnership between the government and industry is essential,” he added.

Pascal Berteaud, Director General, IGN, the national mapping authority of France, also spoke on the extensive use of geoinformation and innovative technologies like BIM for development activities in France. Geospatial information is the basis for optimisation of mobility and transport, real-time information, on assets, intelligence road reference systems, automation process for detecting road components, maintenance of transport infrastructure etc. He underlined that highly accurate measurements must be undertaken according to geospatial geodetic frames for managing underground infrastructure. Stating that 3D models enable town planners and construction workers to deal with new issues like optimising sunlight, reducing pollution, waste management etc, Berteaud said that France is working on developing a 3D model for its underground infrastructure and is employing highly advanced technologies in the project.

Source: Our correspondent