GWF2014: Need conducive policy environment to make geospatial mainstay of decision-making

GWF2014: Need conducive policy environment to make geospatial mainstay of decision-making

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Geneva: Geospatial technology is an important ingredient for national development. But to realise the benefits of geospatial technology, an enabling policy framework is essential. The high-level ministerial panel on “Geospatial Policy for National and Regional Development” organised as part of Geospatial World Forum 2014 stressed the need to create conducive policy environment to make geospatial the mainstay of decision making.

Enumerating the several initiatives in Ghana, Alhaji AB Inusah Fuseini, Minister for lands and Natural Resources informed that Ghana is actively working on developing an integrated LIS programme, which will integrate all spatial data through time, remove duplication and improve service delivery. It is also actively working on establishing a national spatial data agency and is taking all measures to bring in a legislation in the near future.

Ministerial panel on Geospatial Policy for National and Regional Development
The high-level ministerial panel on “Geospatial Policy for National and Regional Development” organised as part of Geospatial World Forum 2014.

Dr Abu Twalib Kasenally, Minister of Housing and Lands, Mauritius stressed the importance of up-to-date information in fostering economic and social development and informed that his government is aware of the significance and is working through several initiatives. Mauritius has brought in the Cadastral Survey Act 2011 to regulate land survey processes and is working on building a modern and efficient land administration system with the support of the University of Western Australia.

Highlighting India’s biggest project “National GIS’, Dr Shailesh Nayak, Secretary, Ministry of Earth Sciences, India noted that policy makers should keep three aspects while formulating policies – the earth system, the social system and the human system. He enumerated how the scientific aspects of the earth system should link with the economic, political and industrial system (social system) to improve the quality of people (human system).

Dato James Dawos Mamit, Deputy Minsiter, Minsitry of Natural Resources, Malaysia outlined the geospatial activities in Malaysia and informed that Malaysia has been using geospatial technology for long but as technology progresses, Malaysia is finding its way forward by implementing the same for national development.

Prashant Shukle, Director General, Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation informed the audience that data/information is viewed as a natural resource and as a global currency in Canada. Saying that the true value of geospatial data can be realised by its liberation and use, Prashant informed that the open data initiatives taken by Canadian government in the recent past underscoring that geoinformation contributes to Canadian economy to the tune of billions.

Enumerating the activities of United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), Sally Fegan-Wyles, Assistant Secretary General-UN and Director-UNITAR underscored that if the ambitious goals of UN towards reducing poverty are to be materialised, geoinformation and a policy that best guides the use of geoinformation is key.

The representative of Florence Modupeola Oguntuase, Commissioner of Establishments, Training and Pensions, Lagos State government, Nigeria described the earth observation capabilities of Nigeria and enumerated all the geospatial activities happening in Nigeria. Karam Hasanov, State Committee on Property Issues, Azerbaijan, presented the case of the East European country.

Source: Our correspondent