ClearWater: A map with a human touch to details

ClearWater: A map with a human touch to details

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The newly designed map guides users through stories from the five different indigenous tribes who have been working with ClearWater to build rainwater collection systems to use in lieu of their polluted water sources. Eucador: On 26 March, the nonprofit initiative ClearWater, in partnership with the human rights and technology organisation Digital Democracy, launched a new type of online mapping project that ventures into the realm of digital storytelling. The ClearWater map not only shows the scale of the water pollution in the Amazon of northern Ecuador, but also highlights the human side of environmental damage.

The newly designed map guides users through stories from the five different indigenous tribes who have been working with ClearWater to build rainwater collection systems to use in lieu of their polluted water sources. It also allows them to update the maps by inputting data through a simple Google spreadsheet that they have been trained to use. Some of the blog entries are written by the local communities and have been translated into English.

The interactive map is part of Digital Democracy's Remote Access Program, funded by a Knight Foundation News Challenge grant, which focuses on building tools to help communities in remote/off-the-grid areas to more easily gather, manage and share information about human rights and environmental abuses. In addition to collaborating with ClearWater in Ecuador, Dd is piloting new tools with indigenous communities in Peru, Guyana and Mexico

In the future, Digital Democracy hopes to create a template for this type of map-based story telling platform and release it on Github

Source: Digital Democracy