Bushfire Hotspots online

Bushfire Hotspots online

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ACRES staff contributed to the development of an internet-based satellite mapping system to be used in the fight against bushfires in Australia. The system, known as the Sentinel Hotspots, can be used to identify and zoom in on fire hotspots that pose a potential risk as well as monitor bush fires as they develop. The system was developed by scientists from CSIRO Land and Water with funding from the Defence Imagery and Geospatial Organisation (DIGO) in collaboration with Geoscience Australia, NASA and the US Geological Survey. Sentinel Fire Mapping is a mapping tool designed to provide timely fire location data to emergency service managers across Australia. The mapping system allows users to identify fire locations that pose a potential risk to communities and property.

Geoscience Australia has acquired several satellite images that show quite starkly the extent of the fires that swept through the Australian Capital Territory last January culminating in the loss of four lives and the destruction of 474 houses in the south-western suburbs and nearby forest areas. The images featured were acquired on 7 November 2002 and 26 January 2003 and contrast the areas covered by previously healthy vegetation and the burn scars resulting from the devastating bushfires.

ACRES now provide online delivery as a routine option for all standard data products. This service is available in addition to the existing online delivery options offered through the Priority Processing and STAR services. Online delivery gives customers faster access to range of products from the Landsat, RADARSAT and ERS satellites that are currently available on a single CD-ROM.

The Sentinel Fire Mapping website is an internet-based mapping tool designed to provide timely fire location data to emergency service managers across Australia. The mapping system allows users to identify fire locations that pose a potential risk to communities and property. It can be accessed using a standard web browser. Locations of high temperature are identified and extracted from the image into a small text file and transmitted from Alice Springs to Canberra where they are fed into a spatial database. From there the data can be queried and added to dynamically created maps using a web-based mapping system. Users can access the map website with a standard browser to query the database for fire locations, and select layers of contextual information to create map displays of areas of interest.