12-years of deforestation lost a land size of Scotland

12-years of deforestation lost a land size of Scotland

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UK: To measure the forest loss from 7,000 key sites of BirdLife International, in the UK, conservation scientists from RSPB and their colleagues from Italy have assessed satellite data from 2000-2012. The data shows a collective forest land (including all these sites), which was spread in 2.9 million km sq. in 2000, had been reduced to around 73,000 km sq. This means a land of the size of Scotland, has been completely deforested in last twelve years.

Key countries with highest forest loss are Brazil, Paraguay, Indonesia, Malaysia, Madagascar and Ghana, and major losses in South America and South-East Asia. “It is the biodiverse tropics which are again suffering most,” said Dr Graeme Buchanan, senior conservation scientist at the RSPB Centre for Conservation Science and a co-author of the study.

Conservation scientists from the RSPB (BirdLife in the UK), BirdLife International, and colleagues in Italy assessed satellite data to measure forest loss in 7,000 key sites for nature from 2000-2012. Forest covered around 2.9 million km2 of land in these IBAs in 2000, but had decreased by around 73,000 km2 (an area the size of Scotland) by 2012 – a 2.5% loss across all IBAs.

Key countries with highest forest loss are Brazil, Paraguay, Indonesia, Malaysia, Madagascar and Ghana, and major losses in South America and South-East Asia. “It is the biodiverse tropics which are again suffering most,” said Dr Graeme Buchanan, senior conservation scientist at the RSPB Centre for Conservation Science and a co-author of the study.

In the new study, scientists used satellite imagery to measure forest loss remotely across the global network of Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs). They quantified forest loss between 2000 and 2012 across 7,279 of the world’s IBAs that support forest bird species.

Source: Birdlife