Esri story map highlights change in the new US immigration policy

Esri story map highlights change in the new US immigration policy

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GIS and mapping behemoth Esri has come up with its immigration policy story map that highlights the possible impacts of the new immigration policy in America. The map tries to present a picture on where the immigrants will be affected by the change of policy, or who will be most affected by it.

The map explores the balance and distribution of the US citizen and non-citizen residents in each census tract. Divided into Purple and Green, where Purple indicates distributions of non-citizen residents, Green indicates distributions of the US citizens.

Using data from the American Community Survey, the story map shows the number and proportion of non-citizen foreign-born people in the United States. The larger purple circles on the map indicate greater relative shares of non-citizen foreign-born people in an area.

The map encircles states, counties, and cities with dark outlines that have been denoted as the Sanctuary Areas by the Center for Immigration Studies. For more information about the distribution of residents in an area, you can zoom in and click any census tract. The map uses data from the American Community Survey to show the number and proportion of non-citizen foreign-born people in the United States.

Using data from USC Dornsife’s Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration, this map reveals clusters of DACA recipients and their estimated economic impact at the congressional district level. The larger the circle, the more DACA recipients in a district. The color of the circle indicates the estimated GDP lost if these workers are removed.

In order to balance the overall number of immigrants arriving based on family relationships, the US Congress established a complicated system for calculating the available number of family preference visas for any given year. The number is determined by starting with 480,000 and then subtracting the number of immediate relative visas issued during the previous year and the number of aliens “paroled” into the U.S. during the previous year.

Any unused employment preference immigrant numbers from the preceding year are then added to this sum to establish the number of visas that remain for allocation through the preference system. However, by law, the number of family-based visas allocated through the preference system may not be lower than 226,000.