June 2018 the 5th hottest on global record

June 2018 the 5th hottest on global record

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Global warming is increasing at an alarming pace and posing a dire threat to human survival on the planet. There have been reports that say that by the next century large parts of South Asia would become too hot for human habitation and the rise in temperature would lead to ecological devastation, environmental crisis and the worst affected would be the poor in the under-developed and developing countries. Global warming would soon acquire catastrophic proportions if nothing is done. Every year, previous records are being broken by consecutive record-breaking hot years.

NOAA(National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)recently analyzed that June 2018 was the 5th warmest year on record.

Image Courtesy: NOAA

The average global temperature in June was 1.35 degrees F above the 20th-century average of 59.9 degrees. This was the fifth highest for June in the 139-year record (1880–2018).

The average Arctic sea ice coverage (extent) in June was 9.0 percent below the 1981–2010 average, the fourth-smallest extent for June on record. However, there was above-average sea ice in the eastern Hudson Bay. The Antarctic sea ice extent last month was 3.8 percent below average, the eighth smallest on record for June.

Image Courtesy: NOAA

June 2018 was hotter than average across all continents, with the highest temperature rise being recorded in Central Asia ( 4 degree Celsius higher than normal). In parts of Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans too observed record temperature. The only area with record cold June temperatures was the northern Atlantic Ocean, off Greenland’s southern coast.

Also Read: Indian Subcontinent may become too hot for human survival in the next 80 years

The globally-averaged temperature across land and ocean surfaces was the fifth highest on record for June at 0.75°C (1.35°F) above the 20th century average of 15.5°C (59.9°F). The ten warmest Junes on record have occurred since 2005, with 2016 the warmest June at +0.91°C (+1.64°F). June 2018 also marks the 42nd consecutive June and the 402nd consecutive month with temperatures, at least nominally, above the 20th-century average.

Image Courtesy: NOAA

Record hot temperature was also observed in parts of the Mediterranean Sea and neighboring areas. New Zealand and small areas across North America, Asia, and Australia also had record hot temperatures.

Taken as a whole, the combined land and ocean surface temperature for the globe during January–June 2018 was 0.77°C (1.39°F) above the 20th-century average and the fourth highest since global records began in 1880. The global land-only temperature was the fifth highest on record at +1.19°C (+2.14°F). The global ocean-only temperature of 0.60°C (1.08°F) above average was also the fifth highest on record, says the NOAA study.

Five of the six continents had a January–June period temperature that was among the ten warmest on record. Europe, Africa, and Oceania had a January–June temperature that ranked among the five highest since continental records began in 1910.

The ten warmest Junes on record have occurred since 2005, with 2016 the warmest June at +0.91°C (+1.64°F). June 2018 also marks the 42nd consecutive June and the 402nd consecutive month with temperatures, at least nominally, above the 20th-century average.

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