NASA’s satellite images, a tribute to 9/11

NASA’s satellite images, a tribute to 9/11

SHARE

The world got a rude shock sixteen years ago on September 11, 2001. Terrorist outfit Al-Qaeda shook the US soil by launching deadliest attacks that crashed planes into New York City’s World Trade Center, the Pentagon in Washington, DC, and a field in Pennsylvania.

While the devastation was enormous and people could keep a track of the new developments bit-by-bit through intense media coverages, the whole event could also be seen from the space as well. One such example is of NASA’s American astronaut Frank Culbertson, who was a witness to the whole event from orbit as he worked on the International Space Station.

Given below are some of the photos from the Culbertson’s series that shows the New York City during 9/11 attacks. Also, along with this, there are other satellite views of the attacks and aftermath of the event.

NASA Commemorates 9/11 Anniversary

This image is one of a series taken on September 9, 2001, of metropolitan New York City by the International Space Station’s Expedition 3 crew that shows the smoke plume rising from the Manhattan. Credit: NASA

Smoke still rising from Manhattan two days following

This Landsat 5 acquired this image of New York City two days after the terrorist attacks that destroyed the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, as smoke continued to emanate from lower Manhattan. Credit: NASA/US Geological Survey

Smoke plume rising from Manhattan 2

One of a series of pictures of metropolitan New York City taken by one of the Expedition Three crew members onboard the International Space Station (ISS) at various times during the day on September 11, 2001. A smoke plume rises from the Manhattan area where the World Trade Center was destroyed. The orbital outpost was flying at an altitude of approximately 250 miles. Credit: NASA

SPOT satellite image of World Trade Center fires

SPOT satellite image of Manhattan, acquired on September 11 at 11:55 AM EST, three hours after two planes crashed into the World Trade Center. The colors result from the use of infrared bands to identify the actual fire hot spots (see red spots near the base of the smoke plume). The SPOT satellites orbit at an altitude of 822 km. Credit: CNES/SPOT Image 2001

Smoke plume rising from Manhattan 3

One of a series of pictures of metropolitan New York City taken by one of the Expedition Three crew members onboard the International Space Station (ISS) at various times during the day on September 11, 2001. A smoke plume rises from the Manhattan area where the World Trade Center was destroyed. The orbital outpost was flying at an altitude of approximately 250 miles. Credit: NASA

Smoke plume rising from Manhattan 4

One of a series of pictures of metropolitan New York City taken by one of the Expedition Three crew members onboard the International Space Station (ISS) at various times during the day on September 11, 2001. A smoke plume rises from the Manhattan area where the World Trade Center was destroyed. The orbital outpost was flying at an altitude of approximately 250 miles. Credit: NASA

World Trade Center Aftermath as Seen by IKONOS Satellite

This one-meter resolution satellite image of Manhattan, New York was collected at 11:43 a.m. EDT on Sept. 12, 2001 by Space Imaging’s IKONOS satellite. The image shows an area of white dust and smoke at the location where the 1,350-foot towers of the World Trade Center once stood. IKONOS travels 423 miles above the Earth’s surface at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour. Credit: GeoEye

World Trade Center Aftermath as Seen by IKONOS Satellite

Space Imaging’s IKONOS satellite collected this image of Manhattan, New York at 11:54 a.m. EDT on Sept. 15, 2001. The image shows the remains of the 1,350-foot towers of the World Trade Center, and the debris and dust that settled throughout the area. Also visible are many emergency and rescue vehicles in the streets. IKONOS orbits 423 miles above the Earth’s surface at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour. Credit: GeoEye

NASA’s Terra satellite shows the fire plume from Manhattan

Image from NASA’s Terra Satellite shows the fire plume from Manhattan after the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. These images were put together from Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. They were taken from an altitude between 620 and 876 nautical miles above the Earth’s surface. Credit: NASA