Thoughts on LIS in India Policies and reorganisation

Thoughts on LIS in India Policies and reorganisation

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Prabhakar misra
Prabhakar misra
Consultant in Land Information Technologies
[email protected]

This paper tries to look into the present technologies and policies in India to present a different view or suggestion for improvement. The views are not limited to only the technical and production process regarding geomatics products and services in Indian environment, but go beyond and touch the structure of the organisations in geomatics sector. In order to do justice for the new thinking a model for change is suggested

Till almost early seventies, Survey of India was synonymous with the surveying profession in India. That situation has evolved and changed to quite an extent now. The reason is that many new and other organisations have carved out their own niche in the domain of surveying and mapping. These new entities have been generally propelled either by the new technology or due to unmet demand of a particular type of information – (example, Forest Survey of India).

The surveying and mapping (called geomatics in this paper) have embraced many new disciplines and spread over a much wider span. The surveying and mapping discipline has thus taken a bigger and focussed name of Land Information Technologies (refer to BOX-1). Many find it convenient to call these by Geoinformatics or geomatics.

A judicious combination of these technologies is designed for a given geomatics project.

This paper tries to look into the present technologies and policies to present a different view or suggestion for improvement. The views are not limited to only the technical and production processes but go beyond the structure of the organisations in the geomatics sector. A model for change is first evolved. The suggested changes are then discussed. This paper also recognises the presence of government organisations in India namely: Survey of India, Naval Hydrography Office of Navy, MO-GSGS (Army Survey Directorate), National Remote Sensing Agency, Indian Space Research Organisation and many other members of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian Institute of Technology (Roorkee) and many private organisations. The state cadastral surveys organisations are very much affected by the survey policies, hence, their requirements should have a place in new thinking.

Box 1: Land Information technologies
  • Field Surveying, Control By Total Station, Type of Equipment
  • Global Positioning System (GPS) for field control
  • Aerial Photography and Photogrammetry
  • Satellite Imagery and Remote Sensing
  • Geographic Information System (GIS)
    Some New Technologies:
  • Air Borne Laser Terrain Modeling (ALTM)
  • Radar Interferometry
  • Technology available for digital printing of maps instead of ‘offset’ printing
  • Transmitting graphic (map) information ‘on-line’. Application of internet, compression of data