Representing ride check survey data in a GIS

Representing ride check survey data in a GIS

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Chiedza Dondo
Chiedza Dondo
Department of Geomatics
University of Cape Town, South Africa
[email protected]

Rivett U Dr
Department of Civil Engineering,
University of Cape Town, South Africa

The South African government came up with a policy that makes it compulsory for every local authority to have a current public transport record. This paper presents a data model that can be used to assist in management of ride check survey data in a GIS. The data model presented in this paper can be extended and used to represent other transport survey data

It is essential for local authorities and public transport service providers to carry out surveys on public transport usage regularly. The data collected from these surveys is instrumental in the planning and design of public transport facilities and in planning for future use of public transport (Macpherson 1993).

The methods of data collection have evolved from manual methods to electronic methods and at the same time many local authorities are adopting GIS for transport information management and service planning. With continuing advances in technology, the extent, accuracy and amount of collected data is limitless. The only challenge lies in trying to organise this data so that it fits in with the rest of the local authorities’ spatial and attribute data in the GIS and serves its intended purpose.

Background
Recognising the importance of surveys to public transport service planning and information management, the government of South Africa has set up policies that make it compulsory for every local authority to maintain a current public transport record. This current public transport record should give an overview of the extent of public transport services and the availability and location of public transport facilities. It should also contain information on current public transport usage statistics and public transport users preferences and needs (Department of Transport, 2001).

In order to acquire data on current public transport usage statistics and public transport users preferences and needs, each transport authority has to carry out public transport surveys. In Cape Town, South Africa, one of the most common surveys used to collect this data are ride check surveys (Moving Ahead 2001). Ride check surveys are also considered more advantageous than other public transport surveys, which involve the distribution of questionnaires to passengers, because ride check surveys are based on the observation method of data collection. This method leads to the collection of more accurate data because it does not rely on the respondent’s willingness and ability to respond to the questions (Wermuth et al 2001).