Marine cadastre is still a topic of seminars

Marine cadastre is still a topic of seminars

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prof jacub rais
prof jacub rais
member of indonesian
academy of sciences,
Professor emeritus at the institute of technology bandung, jakarta
[email protected]

Prof Jacub Rais, member of Indonesian Academy of Sciences, deliberates on status, issues and challenges before geomatics in Indonesia. He also speaks about Indonesian NSDI and importance of marine cadastre in the Indonesian context

What is the present status of geomatics in Indonesia?
Since 1997 the Indonesian Geomatics Council (IGC) was established by national geomatics communities (private companies, government institutions, educational establishments and professional organizations). Being a council its main missions are, among others: (a) normative in nature, such as upholding ethics in the conduct of business, (b) provision of advice to the government on human resources development, and (c) initiating professional certification of geomatics competency standards as stipulated by ISO TC/211 as well as by APEC Human Resources Development Program for mutual recognition of competency standards in surveying within the APEC Member Countries. The Qualifying Bodies are the respective professional organizations, such as Indonesian Surveyors Association (ISI) for surveyors, the Indonesian Remote Sensing Society (MAPIN) for remote sensing profession (technicians, technologists and professionals). GIS community will take care of writing standard specifications of GIS professional certifications. CGI will act as Certifying Body to be accredited by a independent body established by Government’s Ministries (Ministry of National Education and Ministry of Labor) and the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce, KADIN) which is called a “National Body for Certification of Professions (Badan Nasional Sertifikasi Profesi, BNSP).

NSDI and its predecessor the “data exchange format, and the SIGNAS (National GIS)” have been discussed for more than 20 years, and until today still not yet operational. Meantime, with the enactment of autonomous regional governments there is a call for easy access of sectoral data stored at the central government databases

What are the key issues and challenges for geomatics in Indonesia?
The word “geomatics” itself is kown in a limited circle; but everyone knows what GIS, RS and Surveying are. Access to outside information and literatures is limited by high cost of books and high subscription rate of journals.

How do you see governments’ control over usage of spatial data?
In Indonesia, security clearance is required only in the case of aerial photography from the Department of Defense. There is no other control for usage of spatial data.

How do you see the present status of geomatics education in Indonesia?
Some older universities are advanced in teaching the applications of GIS and Remote Sensing. Images can be obtained from LAPAN (National Aeronautics and Space Agency) or purchased from outside. As a matter of fact, within ASEAN, Indonesia I belief, is the first country in applying remote sensing technologies for natural resources assessment. I know this, because I was one of a 3-man mission of UN ESCAP in 1975 traveling all the way from Iran to Korea to assess the benefit of the use of Landsat-1 at that time. However, until today Indonesia has no single National Remote Sensing Center. At national level there are three powerful agencies in remote sensing, i.e., LAPAN, BAKOSURTANAL and BPPT, their respective missions are somewhat overlapping. I once proposed to the government through the Minister of State in Science and Technology to re-assign each agency in one field of responsibility, i.e., in land resources, marine and fisheries, and atmosphere. Respectively.

What is the status of building a marine cadastre with respect to the country’s marine resources? What are the issue besetting this aspect?
Marine Cadastre is still a topic of seminars/symposia, while the ocean space is already partitioned for various commercial uses, such as pearls cultivation, seaweed cultivation, sand mining etc. A number of conflict ever happened. between sea lanes and the placing of fish traps (bagan).

The issue besetting this aspect the slowness of legislation on cadastre system at sea. The issue of marine tenure is also a topic of seminars.

How would you like to comment on Indonesian NSDI?
NSDI and its predecessor the “data exchange format, and the SIGNAS (National GIS)” have been discussed for more than 20 years, and until today still not yet operational.

While in the meantime, with the enactment of autonomous regional governments there is a call for easy access of sectoral data stored at the central government databases. It is now the task BAKOSURTANAL: with an assignment a specific deputyship at this agency dealing with NSDI to make the system an operational system.

In Indonesia, security clearance is required only in the case of aerial photography from the Department of Defense. There is no other control for usage of spatial data

What status does Indonesia enjoys with regards to the development of geomatics when compared to those other Asian countries?
I have no idea in what field we enjoy with the development of geomatics in Indonesia from economic point of view. I have no information on the revenue we generate from geomatic industries. Some of the projects are not a specific project on geomatics but a built-in activity in engineering and resources assessment project.

We have no software development industries yet. I have no comparison made with other countries in Asia.